Land

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“Now the hard work begins”: Environmental leaders on the COP15 Biodiversity Framework

Global leaders agreed to halt biodiversity loss by protecting 30% of the world’s land and ocean by 2030. Leaders from environmental organizations around the world react to the deal, highlighting its merits and the potential issues that come with it. From “a watershed moment” to “we don’t need people to tell us what to do”, the consensus is that governments need to treat the Kuming-Montreal Biodiversity framework “as a floor, not a ceiling”.

Now is the time for action: The COP15 on biodiversity

“Paris moment for nature”, is the phrase being used to raise expectations: the COP15, due to be held in Canada, must play a crucial role in halting biodiversity loss and restoring nature over the next decade. However, according to global media predictions, there is something that may undermine the impact of the event before it has even begun.

COP27 Adaptation and Agriculture Day

Climate change impacts are already affecting our existence and that of the natural resources which allow us to live on this planet. In this context, adaptation and resilience are crucial for all countries and regions worldwide, especially those more vulnerable to such impacts. Below is a short summary of CMCC’s latest scientific results on adaptation planning, agriculture and food security, the topics at the core of the discussion in Egypt, at COP27 on November 12. Have a look!

COP27 Biodiversity Day

Biodiversity and Climate

Discussions about climate must go hand in hand with discussions about the environment and hence biodiversity. This not only means looking at how to ensure biodiversity is maintained and promoted but also how nature itself can be a vital instrument in climate proofing the planet. Biodiversity is the core of COP15 in Montreal and was one of the main topics at COP27 in Egypt. A list of resources to better understand the climate-biodiversity nexus.

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The climate stories stored in trees

What does uncovering the mysteries surrounding sunken ships have in common with understanding our climate? Both involve looking at tree cores and studying the historical archives contained within their inner rings. Dendrochronology, literally the study of tree time, offers a view into the past that provides vital information about our present and future.

Wildfires: Compromising A Key Natural Climate Solution

Australia is experiencing the worst wildfires seen in decades, as drought and heatwaves fan the flames. In the summer and Autumn of 2019, a significant increase in wildfires brought the Amazon close to a tipping point with global ramifications. Some of these fires were caused by man as land is cleared to make way for agribusiness, logging, mining and other “development” projects. While climate change is exacerbating bushfire intensity and damages, experts and policymakers are calling for strong measures to save what is one of the planet’s main carbon sinks and a vital natural climate solution.

Italy has much to say about climate change and how it affects land

Sustainable agriculture, adaptation plans and creativity are all needed to drive a high quality productive sector that considers scientific knowledge on climate change and sustainability. Italy can play an important role in a global context where, among others, food, eating habits, sustainable land use and the dialogue between science and society are crucial elements.

Mountains Matter for the World’s Youth at COP25

For the 2019 International Mountain Day, the theme of choice is “Mountain’s matter for youth”. Mountain areas are home to over 1 billion people and represent an invaluable asset with the power to inspire people to act on climate change and contribute to our Sustainable Development Goals. As the COP25 is underway the topic of mountains is a side-issue that is also gaining attention due to the importance of mountains for both up and downstream populations. 

Addressing Wildlife Trade with Science and Local Knowledge

Due to human activity we are currently undergoing Earth’s sixth mass extinction. Delegations from all over the world came together in Switzerland at the CITES conference to debate how to protect over 500 endangered species by regulating wildlife trade.